Mango Steel Cut Oatmeal

This post is sponsored by National Mango Board. Mango Steel Cut Oatmeal makes for a delicious and wholesome breakfast! Packed with juicy mango and fiber for a satisfying spin on oatmeal.

white bowl of oatmeal with mango on top

white bowl of oatmeal with mango on top
Let’s have a virtual oatmeal (and coffee) date!

If we were chatting over oatmeal and java, I’d tell you that it’s the little things keeping me going these days. The 70 degree days where the air feels cooler and I could walk for hours.

The early morning hours reading a book that has nothing to do with self help and everything to do with fantasy lands.

Listening to an album I haven’t heard since high school.

Making a recipe that makes me feel comfy cozy. Like oatmeal!

Because we all deserve a bright spot in your morning and mango is here to stay.

Remember my Overnight Steel Cut Oatmeal? We still have it for breakfast several times a week, so I thought it was high time to make a fun flavored version.

Speaking of mango, who’s tried my favorite Fancy Toast with Mango? Those combos are too good.

Did you know mango is packed with nutrients like vitamin C? Lucky for us, there are six varieties of mangos. Since they’re in season year-round, you can get your mango on any time of year!

pink pot with oatmeal and spatuapink pot with oatmeal and spatuaTips for the best oatmeal

I just adore the texture of steel cut oatmeal. It’s the least processed of the oats we eat, just a step down from the oat groat. It hasn’t been steam-flattened like rolled oats, so it does take a little longer to cook. I assure you that the flavor and texture is worth it, though!

  1. Don’t overcook it. The chewiness is key! You want to turn off the heat before it’s too thick because it will get much thicker as it cools and even more thick once it’s in the refrigerator. Don’t be afraid to add more liquid at the end or after it’s been refrigerated to help loosen it up.
  2. Add salt. A wise woman once said, “Oatmeal without salt is like a concert without music.” Ha! Truth be told, oatmeal sans salt is very one-dimensional. So, whatever you do, don’t skip the salt! It’s key for flavor.
  3. Make it creamy. In today’s recipe, we’re using coconut oil for mouthfeel, but you could also cook the oats in milk to add that satisfying touch.
  4. Top liberally: Add a swirl of nut butter for a boost of “good” fats and plant protein, hemp seeds, coconut, or fruit. Give that bowl some staying power!

Topping ideas

Let’s accessorize, shall we? The options are endless when it comes to toppings, from smooth and creamy nut butters to crunchier add-ins like nuts, coconut, or seeds.

  • Almond butter. There’s something about silky, nutty almond butter paired with bright mango that really does it for me.
  • Coconut. I like the texture and flavor of unsweetened flaked coconut here.
  • More mango. We’re doubling up on the mango greatness by cooking mango into the oatmeal itself and adding it on top. The combo of cooked mango paired with fresh is sheer perfection.
  • Coconut sugar. A sprinkle of sweetness to take it over the top! Maple syrup is also great.
  • Fresh mint. I have mint growing like a wild child in my backyard, so you better believe that pop of green made its way into this oatmeal. It tastes so refreshing, too!

up close overhead bowl of mango oatmealup close overhead bowl of mango oatmealHow to cut mango into slices

See those glorious mango slices on top? You can’t miss ’em. Slicing mango is so much easier than it looks! Scroll down on this post for step by step photos on how to slice a mango.

  1. Always give the mango a good rinse before cutting it. (Same goes for avocado!)
  2. Use a cutting board and a sharp knife to slice each side along the pit. If your knife keeps hitting the seed without getting a good chunk of fruit, you’re on the wrong side!
  3. Slice the flesh vertically, being careful not to cut through the skin.
  4. Use a spoon to scoop out the slices, and then layer them as a topping.

How to make overnight oatmeal

Looking to set it and forget it? I hear ya! You can spend two minutes in the evening bringing the oatmeal to a boil and then let it sit overnight to cook fully. Voila–ready to eat oatmeal in the morning.

Simply combine the oats, water, coconut oil, salt, cardamom, and coconut sugar in a pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat a bit, and cook for 2 minutes. Remove from heat, cover, and let it sit out overnight. In the morning, stir in the mango and vanilla extract.

For the full instructions, check out my overnight oatmeal recipe.

bowl of oatmeal with gold spoonbowl of oatmeal with gold spoonStorage tips

This recipe makes enough to feed 3-4 people. Oatmeal for the whole fam!

  • You can store leftover steel cut oatmeal in the refrigerator for up to four days and in the freezer for three months. To reheat, simply mix your desired portion with a little water or milk and warm it in the microwave or on the stove.
  • You can also freeze leftovers in pre-portioned containers for busy mornings and transfer them to the refrigerator the night before so they’re ready to go in the morning. I like these glass containers for meal prep.

Happy breakfasting, my little mangos!

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Description

Mango Steel Cut Oatmeal makes for a delicious and wholesome breakfast! Packed with juicy mango and fiber for a satisfying spin on oatmeal.



  1. Place oats, water, 1 diced mango, coconut oil, salt, and cardamom (if using) in a medium pot. Stir to combine and bring to a boil.
  2. Reduce heat to the lowest setting and simmer for about 22 minutes, stirring well every 5 minutes. The oatmeal is done when it still looks somewhat soupy as it will continue to thicken as it cools.
  3. Remove from heat and stir in coconut sugar (add more to taste if desired) and vanilla extract. Portion into bowls and top with fresh mango plus a drizzle of almond butter.

Notes

TO STORE: Store leftovers in an air-tight container for up to 5 days.

TO FREEZE: Portion into individual containers and freeze for up to 3 months.

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